Lascaux cave art

Lascaux cave art

Monday, May 22, 2017

A Dream of the Ancestors and the Mask of Odin-an Update

Last night, quite unusual for me I dreamed almost constantly, waking up, going back to sleep and dreaming again, one after the other, even dreams within dreams. Shortly before waking I had a dream which involved me talking to a dead ancestor. It was impressed upon me that this was a great grandfather. The ancestor did not reveal to me his name but I was trying to work out who he was by the process of mental deduction. The name of the person which was impressed upon me however was that of a great great grandfather so it is possible that the term 'great grandfather' in the dream was not to be taken literally. It was evident to me in the dream that he was dead but yet he appeared alive just as you and I are and his cosy cottage was situated (in the dream) just a few houses away from me so I was conscious that he was always close by. I do not recall what we talked about but he made himself known to me.

It does not surprise me that I dreamed about an ancestor as I have been engaged in researching my ancestry which I am sure will become a life long project! It is also not unusual for the dead to appear in our dreams for the ancients considered that in the dream state, especially before waking we are more receptive to the spirits of the dead and can communicate with them as we do with the living. Frequently the shades of departed relatives appear to me in dreams and I am very conscious that they are dead. On occasions I have had dreams in which people who I am not aware have passed on reveal themselves to me to tell me the news! This was the case with my half sister in Germany who passed on a few years ago.

Immediately after leaving my ancestor's cottage I encountered another dead person, this time my daughter's maternal great grandfather. I asked him to make an engraving on a piece of wood for me, just a bare outline as I knew that he had good practical skills. When he came back, to my surprise I found that he had completed the entire job for me, not just the outline and it turned out to be a carving of a mask of Odin! At this point I awoke. I am not sure what this all means and I am still processing the information but I will edit or add to this article on an ongoing basis. Any interpretations from my readers would be welcome.

UPDATE

I am grateful to Steed for his helpful comment. Since publishing this short article I was driven by a sudden and restless need to research my partner's paternal ancestry, joining it to my own published tree which is a lifetime work in progress!  Her maternal ancestry has already been researched with a line of ancestry leading back to the Volsungs and Odin Himself. I started by exploring her paternal grandmother's ancestry and over several long nights I managed to go back a few generations. The use of census returns can be very helpful in identifying families that you are related to or descended from and can help to confirm an ancestor's identity but the earliest ones available for England and Wales only reach back to the year 1841, the most recent being 1911. They do however contain an absolute wealth of detail in one single document. Civil registration of births, marriages and deaths only started in 1837. Prior to this date you have to rely upon parish records, not all of which have been digitalised. I am fortunate in that my paternal grandmother's ancestry is rooted in North Meols, Lancashire where parish records are freely available online and I am also indebted to the many Wills left by my ancestors from centuries ago as they too are very useful. After reaching a temporary brick wall with her paternal grandmother's ancestry I turned my attention to her paternal grandfather, researching both his paternal and maternal lines and I was surprised to see that his mother's maternal ancestry has already been well researched and I managed to find a line going back to Alfred of Wessex who as we know was a descendant of Woden Himself!

So here we have the crux of the matter and the reason for her grandfather appearing in the dream (alongside my own ancestor) presenting me with a mask of Odin/Woden. This can be no coincidence but demonstrates to us that human consciousness does in fact survive physical death. In the fluid dream state we can encounter the spirits of the 'dead' and other entities, even deities for our conscious critical analytical mind is put to sleep, no longer able to fulfil its 'gatekeeper' role until we are fully awake. Dreams experienced directly before waking linger in the mind longer and are rarely forgotten unlike the ones that we have but cannot recall from the middle of the night. This is what is called the hypnopompic state. Its opposite is the hypnogogic state. I am reminded here that our High Lord Woden is the great psychopomp. He is the great guide of souls between life and death but He has the ability to travel between other worlds and make Himself known even in physical human form. He is the director of dreams and the alterer of consciousness. Often I will ask Woden to guide my dreams using this short invocation formulated by Edred Thorsson:

"Into the well of sleep Oh Woden I wend my way to thee, to learn thy ways and wonders."

I believe it is to be found in The Nine Doors of Midgard but I can't be certain about this! It is a good habit to get into. As I have written before, prayers or invocations are not the preserve of the Abrahamic religions. Before retiring to bed on a night I ask for Thunor's blessing and protection on my household and again this is a good habit to adopt.

The link between the mask of Woden and the grandfather's ancestry is now clear although there are other interpretations, one of which was suggested by Steed. Now I have not yet had the opportunity to analyse this other researcher's findings-it was simply a discovery I 'stumbled' across but it is interesting that I was presented with the mask in its complete form although I only asked for an outline to be carved. This signifies to me that the work has already been done by others. My task was simply to look for and receive this discovery. Woden reveals Himself to us if we keep an open mind and seek Him.

Monday, May 01, 2017

Reverence for the Gods

Whilst listening to an interesting BBC radio programme today on http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p04x9brb regarding the Odinist or Asatru religion in modern day Iceland I was struck by certain comments made by a female practitioner who seems to regards the Gods as being 'equal' to man. This is not the first time that I have encountered this particular perspective and in my opinion it is an inappropriate way to think of our deities.

Many years ago when I was still a xtian I encountered many types of xtians from various denominations and churches and I found that there were two ways in which xtians encountered their god. There was the High Church approach in the Church of England which focussed on ritual and reverence for the xtian god and then at the other end of the spectrum there was the Low Church element which is largely free of ritual and which is also to be found in Non-Conformist denominations. One thing that struck me as rather odd was the practice of some churchgoers, especially the younger ones to actually dress down when going to the 'house of god'; something which I have never understood and at the time considered to be a lack of respect, a lack of awe, a lack of reverence.

One sees this casual approach amongst some heathens today and each time I hear that man is the 'equal to the Gods' I feel rather uneasy about such a statement. If we are the 'equal' of the Gods then why do we worship or honour them? Some would say that the Gods should be viewed in the same way as we view human parents and to a certain extent I understand and in part agree with this sentiment and statement. However the way in which children relate to their parents today in the 'western' world is not a traditional one and is often lacking in respect. Many former xtians, particularly the younger ones take this attitude into heathenism and are quite casual in how they approach the Gods. If we are to expect a great heathen revival then we must examine how we view the Gods that we say that we honour or worship. By the way there is nothing at all wrong with worshipping the Gods. Prayer and worship are not confined to or restricted to the alien Abrahamic religions.

A genuine heathen perspective of the Gods must be rooted in how our ancestors related to them. We may have changed but the Gods have not! One particular clue is to be found in Tacitus' Germania:

"As for gods, Mercury is the one they worship most, and on certain days they think it right to propitiate him with human victims. Hercules and Mars they appease with lawful animals." (9.1, translation by J.B. Rives)

So as my readers can see the worship of the Gods was not a casual affair but something which was taken seriously and in great earnest. There was a desire to please the Gods and sacrifice was seen as a way of doing this. I would like to point out that I am not advocating this practice today although it may be something which is taken up again once the decaying 'New World Order' is finally brought to its knees. What else can we learn from the above passage? Well Mercury who the Romans equated with Woden/Wodan/Wotan "is the one they worship most". This is as it should be for He is THE High Lord of the Teutons. Hercules (Thunor/Thunar/Donar) and Mars (Tiw) were also worshipped but in this case with animals rather than humans. One may speculate here how men were offered to Woden but it seems clear to me that this was by hanging and often this was done at a crossroads. Odin was known as Hangatyr and Hangagud, the God of the hanged. Woden would come and commune with the dead and dying. He like Mercury is the great psychopomp, the conveyor of human souls to the afterlife.

Some may baulk at the concept of human sacrifice but I think this is more to do with the lingering effects of the xtian religion which created the concept of 'sin' and its bedmate 'guilt'. We see this today with the modern religion of the 'holocaust' and the very profitable industry centred around it. Another translation of Germania 9 puts across what I am trying to say more clearly:

"Above all other gods they worship Mercury, and count it no sin, on certain feast-days, to include human victims in the sacrifices offered to him. Hercules and Mars they appease by offerings of animals, in accordance with ordinary civilized custom." (Translation by H. Mattingley and revised by S.A. Handford)

The Germanic tribe which Germania 9 is discussing are the Suebi. This tribe is referred to later on in Germania 39.1:

"The Semnones relate that they are the oldest and noblest of the Suebi. Confidence in their antiquity is confirmed by their cult. At a set time, the peoples who share that name and bloodline send embassies to assemble in a forest hallowed by ancestral auguries and ancient dread, and by slaying a man on behalf of the people they begin the barbaric celebration of their fearful rites." (Rives)
"The oldest and most famous of the Suebi; it is said, are the Semnones, and their antiquity is confirmed by a religious observance. At a set time, deputations from all the tribes of the same stock gather in a grove hallowed by the auguries of their ancestors and by immemorial awe. The sacrifice of a human victim in the name of all marks the grisly opening of their savage ritual." (Mattingley/Handford)
The above passage is quite illuminating. Once again we encounter the reference to human sacrifice but notice here the emotions that are engendered by the Semnones: "ancient dread" and "immemorial awe". The Gods are not to be approached lightly and certainly not as 'equals' for they embody great elemental forces, particularly Woden and Thunor and thus this in itself must demand a certain respect.

There is a great deal of speculation as to who the main deity of the Semnones alluded to in Germania is:
"They revere this grove in other ways too: no one enters unless bound by a shackle, as an inferior who makes manifest the might of the divine. If by chance he stumbles, it is not lawful to lift himself up and rise: they roll out over the ground. On that place their entire superstition is centred, as though from there the tribe has its origin, as though there the god is ruler of all, and the remainder subordinate and submissive." (39.2, Rives)

"Bound by a shackle" or as the earlier Mattingley translation puts it, "bound with a cord". That sounds to me like the noose of the hanged, the torc worn by the Woden initiates!

"Another observance shows their reverence for this grove. No one may enter it unless he is bound with a cord, by which he acknowledges his own inferiority and the power of the deity. Should he chance to fall, he may not raise himself or get up again, but must roll out over the ground. The grove is the centre of their whole religion. It is regarded as the cradle of the race and the dwelling-place of the supreme god to whom all things are subject and obedient." (Mattingley translation)

"Reverence for this grove". This is the right frame of mind in which we must approach the Gods. Indeed unlike the woman speaking in the BBC documentary our ancestors did not believe themselves to be 'equal' to the Gods: quite the contrary! "By which he acknowledges his own inferiority and the power of the deity." We may be children of All Father; we may even trace our lineage back to Him but we are not Gods. The most that we can aim to become is a God-Man but we are still separate from the Gods and owe our existence to them along with all that we have and are. The adjectives that are relevant in the above passage are "subordinate", "submissive", "subject" and "obedient". These are not popular words in 21st century England which is plagued by the concepts of equality and torments itself over racial equality, gender equality and rights for homosexuals. Our ancestors did not focus on 'rights' but duty, honour and loyalty without which a folk cannot exist.

My readers will note something else very important that Tacitus writes in Germania 9: " At a set time, deputations from all the tribes of the same stock gather in a grove" or "At a set time, the peoples who share that name and bloodline send embassies to assemble in a forest". Our religion was NEVER universalist. It was always a religion of Blut und Boden or blood and soil and the universalists would do well to ponder that historical fact!

One may ask what is the difference in this attitude and that of the Abrahamic religions which focus on submission to their god? The difference is not so much in attitude but how we come to the Gods to begin with. All forms of Germanic heathenism stress that we do not seek to 'convert' others and certainly never by force unlike the desert religions. THIS is the key difference but I see no reason why we should accord less honour to the deities of our folk and race than the monotheists grant to their alien and universalist god. The Gods should not be viewed just as archetypes but as very real spiritual entities by which we are bound by our very existence. As a folk we cannot survive without them for they are our life source but they too need us for we are reminded of the expression "every race has its soul and every soul its race".